What's New:


The true story of the friendship-and rivalry-among the greatest American generals of World War II. 

Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower, General George S. Patton, and General Omar N. Bradley engineered the Allied conquest that shattered Hitler’s hold over Europe. But they also shared an intricate web of relationships going back decades. In the cauldron of World War II, they found their prewar friendships complicated by shifting allegiances, jealousy, insecurity, patriotism, and ambition.

Meticulously researched and vividly written, Jonathan W. Jordan’s Brothers Rivals, Victors recounts the battle for Europe through the eyes of these three legendary generals who fought to liberate two continents. For the first time in such detail, the bonds between these battle captains are explored, and readers are treated to a rare insider’s view of life at the summit of raw, violent power. Throughout three years of hard, bloody warfare, Eisenhower, the Alliance’s great diplomat, sought victory in the fighting qualities and tactical genius of his most trusted subordinates, Bradley and Patton. Bradley and Patton, in turn, owed their careers to Eisenhower, who protected them from the slings and arrows of politicians, rival generals, their allies, and the U.S. Navy. The twin pillars of their working relationships were duty and trust. Yet their friendship, so genuine and unalloyed before the war, would be put to the ultimate test as life-and-death decisions were thrust upon them, and honor and duty conflicted with personal loyalty.

Brothers Rivals Victors is drawn from the candid accounts of its main characters, and strips away much of the public image of “Ike” (Eisenhower), the “G.I.’s General” (Bradley), and “Old Blood and Guts” (Patton) to reveal the men lurking beneath the legend. Adding richness to this insider’s story are the words and observations of a supporting cast of generals, staff officers, secretaries, aides, politicians, and wives, whose close proximity to Eisenhower, Bradley and Patton in times of stress and tranquility are brought together to produce a uniquely intimate account of a relationship that influenced a war. The story of how these three great strategists pulled together to wage the deadliest conflict in history, despite their differences and rivalries, is marvelously told in this eye-opening narrative, sure to become a classic of military history.

View

U.S. Secret Service Agent Rufus Youngblood was in charge of the vice presidential detail on that tragic day in Dallas when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Immediately upon hearing shots being fired, he pushed Lyndon B. Johnson to the floor of their limousine, shielding the vice president’s body with his own.  This memoir, originally published by Simon & Schuster in 1973, is a candid account of Youngblood’s tenure with this crucial government agency during which he was assigned to protect Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon. Going behind the scenes of some of America’s most pivotal events, he describes the complexities, the risks, and the constant tensions of protecting the American president—including some of the humorous moments and unique characteristics of the chief executives themselves. This new edition now includes 48 pages of archival photographs to enhance readers’ appreciation of this personal, firsthand account of a critical period in American history.

View

In Normandy, 75 Years Later, Klein takes readers on a photographic journey through modern-day Normandy and the historical remnants left behind from one of the most infamous times in history. From bomb craters to German bunkers, Dennis’s photos will reveal scars of the past. Gravestones of fallen soldiers in cemeteries throughout the region are perpetual reminders of the lives that ended too soon. But while the gunfire of the Nazi soldiers and Allied Forces once scarred the earth, the beaches and hamlets have now returned to their original serenity. Poignant in its accurate retelling of the invasion of Normandy, Normandy, 75 Years Later offers readers invaluable insight into the history and beauty of Normandy, France, on the seventy-fifth anniversary of D-Day. He hopes that, in flipping through each page, readers will realize that time truly does heal all wounds.

View

Unique Items:


The name Vince Dooley is synonymous with “football” in the South. More recently, the retired University of Georgia head football coach is gaining renown as one of the region’s finest gardeners. Following the lead of his mentors, respected horticulturalists at the University of Georgia, Dooley has created a spectacular garden around the home that he and his wife Barbara have lived in since 1964. In Dooley’s Garden tells of Dooley’s twenty-year curiosity with gardening—satisfied by nothing short of a full-time commitment to the pursuit.

HARDCOVER/ NEW/ SIGNED BY VINCE DOOLEY/ PAINTINGS BY STEVE PENLEY

View

Acworth: Heritage, History, Hauntings:  This book explores Acworth’s history as documented in newspaper accounts, internet searches and ‘urban legends and folklore’ as told and passed down orally and informally. Jim also conducts the Acworth Ghost Tours and many of the book’s stories are included in the tour.

View